TODAY

– July 29, 2014

Vidak to speak at Tulare dairy luncheon

Andy VidakAndy VidakState Sen. Andy Vidak will be the keynote speaker of the Salute to Dairy Luncheon in Tulare on June 21.

The luncheon, sponsored by the Tulare Chamber of Commerce, will run from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Heritage Complex, 4500 S. Laspina St.

Other sponsors include A&E Pressure Washers, Farm Credit West, Golden State West Far Credit, J.D. Heiskell & Co., Land O' Lakes, Inc. and US Cold Storage.

More than 200 people attend the event each year to celebrate the Tulare area's dairy industry and hear from exhibitors showcasing their products.

Vidak, a cherry farmer from Hanford, will speak on dairy and other agricultural issues during the luncheon.

He represents California's 16th Senate District covering Kings County and parts of Tulare, Fresno and Kern counties.

Tickets are $30 and can be purchased by contacting the Tulare Chamber at (559) 686-1547. More information is available at www.tularechamber.org.

The luncheon is part of the Tulare 2014 Dairy Festival, a 1 1/2-day event focused on the dairy industry.

The festivities kick off June 20 at 6 p.m. with the Tulare County Dairywomen's 30th Annual Dairy Princess Coronation at the Heritage Complex.

Also, the AgVentures! Learning Center at the International Agri-Center will be open from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. with ag-related activities for kids and adults.

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