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– May 29, 2015

Obama's health care overhaul turns into a sprint

The Obama administration could stumble carrying out the complex legislation, or trip up if budget talks lead to scaling back the plan.The Obama administration could stumble carrying out the complex legislation, or trip up if budget talks lead to scaling back the plan.(AP) — The long slog has turned into a sprint. President Barack Obama's health care law survived the Supreme Court and the election; now the uninsured can sign up for coverage in about 11 months.

"We are out of the political gamesmanship and into the reality," said Sandy Praeger, Kansas' Republican insurance commissioner. Next week, states have to say if they're committed to building the framework for delivering health insurance to millions.

Not all hurdles have been cleared.

Republican governors who derided "Obamacare" have to decide whether it's better for their states to now help carry it out. The administration could stumble carrying out the complex legislation, or get tripped up if budget talks with Congress lead to scaling back the plan.

"We are still going to be struggling through the politics, and there are important policy hurdles and logistical challenges," said Andrew Hyman of the nonpartisan Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, helping states carry out the law. "But we are on a very positive trajectory."

Instead of being dismantled by a Republican president and Congress, Obama's law is now on track to take its place alongside Medicare and Medicaid. The action starts right away.

A week from Friday, states must notify Washington if they'll be setting up new health insurance markets, called exchanges, in which millions of households and small businesses will shop for private coverage. The Health and Human Services Department will run the exchanges in states that aren't ready or willing.

Open enrollment for exchange plans is scheduled to start Oct. 1, 2013, and coverage will be effective Jan. 1, 2014.

In all, more than 30 million uninsured people are expected to gain coverage under the law. About half will get private insurance through the exchanges, with most receiving government help to pay premiums.

The rest, mainly low-income adults without children at home, will be covered through an expansion of Medicaid. While the federal government will pay virtually all the additional Medicaid costs, the Supreme Court gave states the leeway to opt out of the expansion. That adds to the uncertainty over how the law will be carried out.

A steadying force within the administration is likely to be HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. The former Kansas governor has said she wants to stay until the law is fully enacted.
Governors will be the main counterparts to Sebelius, and Republicans are leading more than half the states.

Some, like Rick Perry of Texas and Rick Scott of Florida, have drawn a line against helping carry out Obama's law. In other states, voters have endorsed a hard stance. Missouri voters passed a ballot measure Tuesday that would prohibit establishment of a health insurance exchange unless the Legislature approves. State-level challenges to the federal law will continue to percolate.

Other GOP governors have been on the fence, awaiting the outcome of the election. All eyes will be on pragmatists like Chris Christie of New Jersey and Bob McDonnell of Virginia, whose states have done considerable planning to set up exchanges.

"Republican governors are at the center of the health care universe right now," said Michael Ramlet, health policy director at the American Action Forum, a conservative think tank. "They do not have a uniform position."

Virginia's McDonnell, in a rebuff to the administration, said in an interview published Thursday his state would not set up its own exchange, defaulting to a federally run one. McDonnell left open the possibility Virginia might later change course.

Some governors whose states aren't ready to run exchanges are considering the administration's fallback offer to run the new markets through a partnership.

"The real question for Republican governors is: 'Are you going to let the feds come into your state?'" Ramlet said. "The question for the Obama administration is whether they are going to have more flexibility."

Major regulations are due shortly covering such issues as exchange operations, benefits and protections for people with pre-existing health problems. That could signal the administration's willingness to compromise.

A check by The Associated Press found 17 states and the District of Columbia on track to setting up their own exchanges, while 10 have decided not to do so. The federal government could end up running the show in half or more of the states.

The states on track include California, Colorado, Connecticut, Hawaii, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nevada, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, Washington, and West Virginia.

Not setting up exchanges are Alaska, Florida, Louisiana, Maine, New Hampshire, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, and Wisconsin. Missouri and others are likely to join the list.

A recent AP poll found that 63 percent of Americans want states to run the exchanges, with 32 percent favoring federal control.

GOP governors are also seeking flexibility on expanding Medicaid. They are pressing Sebelius on whether the administration will approve partial, less costly expansions, more attractive to cash-pressed states.

As far as Medicaid, 11 states and the District of Columbia have indicated they will expand their programs, while six have said they will not. That leaves more than 30 undecided.

The states definitely expanding Medicaid include California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Vermont, and Washington. Those declining include Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, and Texas.

On Capitol Hill, Republicans say if a budget deal is going to include tax increases, it must also come with cuts to the health care law, or money-saving delays in its implementation.

While major changes can't be ruled out, they don't seem very likely to former Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, D-S.D., who is close to the administration.

"I think Democrats are increasingly emboldened about the health care act," Daschle said. "The president won re-election partly by defending it. There is a new dynamic around the health care effort."

Republican attempts to amend the law will continue, he said, but outright repeal is no longer a possibility.

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Written on 05/29/2015, 9:07 am by Business Journal staff
First Solar, Inc. has donated $10,000 for the creation of a new scholarship at West Hills Community College District (WHCCD). 
Written on 05/29/2015, 9:03 am by Business Journal Staff
California’s tomato processors reported this week they have or will have contracts for 14.3 million tons of processing tomatoes for 2015, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The updated expected production total represents a 2 percent increase from the final contracted production total from 2014. This year’s crop could be the largest California processed tomato crop on record. The previous record was set in 2014 when 14 million tons of processing tomatoes were harvested. In a news release issued today, the USDA’s National Agricultural Statistics Service said the May contracted acreage of 295,000 is 5 percent below the January intentions forecast and 2 percent above last year’s final contracted acreage. Fresno County remains the top California county in contracted planted acreage for 2015 with 91,000 acres of processing tomatoes.  Yolo, Kings, San Joaquin, and Merced make up the remaining top five counties for contracted planted acreage.  The top five counties make up 73 percent of the 2015 total contracted planted acreage for processing tomatoes in California. This early processing tomato estimate is funded by the California League of Food Processors in cooperation with the California Department of Food and Agriculture.
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:45 am by MARTIN CRUTSINGER, AP Economics Writer
(AP) — The U.S. economy shrank at a 0.7 percent annual rate in the first three months of the year, depressed by a severe winter and a widening trade deficit. The government's revision for last quarter was weaker than its initial estimate of a 0.2 percent growth rate. The U.S. trade gap — the difference between the value of exports and the larger value of imports — was found to be wider than first estimated. And consumer spending was slower than previously thought. But steady job gains are expected to fuel modestly healthy growth for the rest of 2015. The harsh winter, which kept many consumers home and businesses closed, and a labor dispute that slowed trade at West Coast ports are both over. Home sales and construction are rebounding, along with business investment. Analysts generally foresee the economy, as measured by the gross domestic product, growing at an annual rate of 2 percent to 2.5 percent in the April-June quarter, with further strengthening later in the year. But risks remain: A stronger dollar, which makes U.S. exports more expensive, will likely continue to keep the trade deficit wide. And cutbacks in oil drilling, a result of low energy prices, could depress spending in the energy industry. "While the evidence of a second-quarter rebound hasn't been overwhelming, we still think that the outlook for the economy is very encouraging," Paul Ashworth, chief U.S. economist at Capital Economics, wrote in a research note. Last quarter's contraction marked the first since a 2.1 percent annual drop in the first three months of 2014, a slump that was also due in part to severe winter weather. Last quarter, the trade gap subtracted 1.9 percentage points from growth, the biggest drag in 30 years. Consumer spending, which drives about 70 percent of economic activity, slowed to annual growth of just 1.8 percent for the quarter, slightly below the government's first estimate. Consumers spent less on mobile phone services, among other expenses, than initially thought. One of the biggest hits to the economy last quarter came from cuts in drilling activity by energy companies — fallout from the sharp drop in oil prices over the past year. The government said investment in the category that covers energy exploration plunged at an annual rate of 48.6 percent, the steepest drop since 2009, during the Great Recession. The government also downgraded its estimate of the boost the economy got from business restocking. That change should be a positive for second quarter growth, because it means businesses won't have as large a backlog of unsold goods. Not all the revisions to the initial estimate for the first quarter were lower. Housing construction and business investment in equipment were both revised higher. Though falling GDP can be a sign of a recession, economists see little cause for such concern this year. Many economists also suspect that the government's calculations have tended to underestimate growth in the first quarter of each year. GDP has contracted in three quarters since the recession ended six years ago, and all three declines came in the first quarter of the year. The outlook has brightened considerably since winter. Most economists expect lower gas prices will eventually accelerate consumer spending, the main fuel for the economy. So far, most consumers haven't used their gasoline savings to spend much more on other goods and services. The average U.S. pump price reached $2.03 a gallon in January, the lowest level in eight years. Though the average has risen back to $2.74, according to AAA, that's still nearly a dollar below its point a year ago. Analysts also say that steadily solid hiring, which has helped cut the unemployment rate to a seven-year low of 5.4 percent, will continue to put money in more people's hands and fuel spending gains. "We are more than halfway through quarter two and we are seeing signs that the economy is recovering from the weak first quarter," said Jennifer Lee, senior economist at BMO Capital Markets. She said several economic reports next week including consumer spending, the trade deficit and auto sales for May should provide important clues on the economy's momentum. Also, some of the first quarter weakness may be revised away by government statisticians, who are studying whether their methods for making seasonal adjustments tend to overstate slowdowns during winter. The Bureau of Economic Analysis has said some adjustments will be reflected in the annual updates to economic growth it will issue in July. The government will release its third and final estimate for first-quarter GDP on June 24.
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:42 am by NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS, Associated Press
(AP) — A record crop of apples, coupled with the West Coast port slowdown earlier this year, is taking a toll on Washington apple growers. Nearly $100 million worth of apples that cannot be sold have been dumped into fields across central Washington, the nation's most productive apple region. The apples are being left to rot and compost in the hot sun, an unusual occurrence for an industry that has found ways to market ever-growing crops. "If we wouldn't have had the port slowdown, we wouldn't have needed this," Todd Fryhover, president of the Washington Apple Commission in Wenatchee, said of the dumping. He estimated that apple exporters lost at least three weeks of their season because of labor problems at West Coast ports. Along with a record supply of apples, that created surpluses that could not be shipped profitably to markets or processors, Fryhover said. "It is unusual," Fryhover said. The Washington State Tree Fruit Association estimated $95 million in lost sales because of apples that could not ship, a figure Fryhover considers low. Washington is by far the nation's largest producer of apples, a crop worth about $2 billion a year to the state's farmers. The 2014 crop totaled a record 150 million boxes, which weigh about 40 pounds each. About a third of the apples each year are exported to more than 60 countries. The labor dispute that hobbled international trade through West Coast seaports earlier this year didn't officially end until last week, when the union representing dockworkers announced its members had ratified a five-year contract. Union leaders had reached a tentative deal in February with the companies that own massive oceangoing ships that bring cargo to and from ports and operate the terminals where that cargo is loaded and unloaded. Ports from San Diego to Seattle were all but shut down several months ago as the two sides haggled. Companies that accused workers of coordinated slowdowns decided to cut their shifts, shuttering ports on nights and weekends. The tit-for-tat led to long lines of ships queueing outside of harbors, waiting for space at the docks. Meanwhile, U.S. exporters complained that their goods — including apples — were stuck on the docks as foreign competitors filled orders that should be theirs. The ports dispute created numerous problems for farmers. A big issue is that apples loaded into unrefrigerated containers sat on docks for weeks waiting to be loaded on a ship, Fryhover said. "It is a perishable crop," he said. The record crop also created a shortage of refrigerated storage space for the apples, which normally can be stored for months and sold year round. The result is lots of apples became too ripe even to be diverted to juice and applesauce makers and other processors, Fryhover said. And prices for processor apples are so low — $10 to $30 a ton — that they do not cover shipping costs, he said. The easiest way to get rid of culled apples is to dump them in fields, he said. That hasn't happened often in the past, but it doesn't create any special problems for the industry, he said. "These are apples," Fryhover said. "We're not throwing our TVs out. They don't harm the environment."
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:40 am by STEVE ROTHWELL, AP Business Writer
(AP) — Female CEOs are outpacing their male colleagues in pay, although they remain vastly outnumbered in the top echelons of American companies. Last year, the median pay for women CEOs rose to $15.9 million, a 21 percent gain from a year earlier, according to a study by executive compensation data firm Equilar and The Associated Press. That compared with median pay for male CEOs of $10.4 million, which was down 0.8 percent from 2013. Marissa Mayer, the head of Yahoo, was the highest-paid female chief executive in the Equilar/AP pay study. Her compensation was almost double that of the next-highest earner on the list — Carol Meyrowitz of discount retailer TJX Companies. Still, there is a big caveat: There are far fewer female CEOs than males among large U.S companies. The study of 340 CEOs included 17 women. No. 1: Marissa Mayer, Yahoo, $42.1 million, up 69 percent Yahoo's stock price has climbed 177 percent since the technology company hired Mayer from Google in July 2012. That compares with a gain of 76 percent for the tech-focused Nasdaq over the same time. Earnings jumped at Yahoo last year after it raised $9.5 billion by selling part of its stake in Alibaba, the Chinese e-commerce site owner. No. 2: Carol Meyrowitz, TJX Companies, $23.3 million, up 13 percent Meyrowitz has led the parent company of T.J. Maxx, Marshalls and other stores, since January 2007. For the year that ended in January, the company reported profit of $2.22 billion on revenue of $29.08 billion. The company said in February that it would lift hourly wages for its employees. Workers that have been employed for six months or more will earn at least $10 an hour. No. 3: Margaret Whitman, Hewlett-Packard, $19.6 million, up 11 percent When Whitman rejoined HP in 2011, the company's board established an initial salary of $1 a year. For 2014, the board decided it was time to raise the salary portion of her pay package to make it consistent with her peers at similar technology companies. Her base salary increased to $1.5 million. No. 4: Indra Nooyi, PepsiCo, $19.1 million, up 45 percent PepsiCo., which makes Frito-Lay snacks, Gatorade sports drinks and Quaker oatmeal, has improved its performance by raising prices and slashing costs. The company's earnings were hit this year by currency volatility in countries like Russia and Bolivia, but this was offset by growth at Frito-Lay North America, which makes snacks such as Doritos, Cheetos and Tostitos. No. 5: Phebe Novakovic, General Dynamics, $19 million, up 1 percent Novakovic was a senior executive at General Dynamics for more than a decade before she was promoted to the top job in January 2013. Since she took the position, the defense contractor's stock has doubled as it has increased dividend payouts and boosted stock buybacks. No. 6: Virginia Rometty, IBM, $17.9 million, up 28 percent The IBM boss was awarded a $3.6 million bonus for her performance last year, even though the company's sales and profits declined. Her overall pay jumped from 2013, when Rometty and other top executives did not take bonuses after IBM turned in disappointing results. No. 7: Marillyn Hewson, Lockheed Martin, $17.9 million, up 13 percent Hewson is a 32-year veteran at Lockheed Martin and the second chief executive at a defense company to top the list of best-paid female CEOs. Her pay award increased as the company's earnings rose. Lockheed's stock also gained nearly 30 percent. No. 8: Patricia Woertz, Archer Daniels Midland, $16.3 million, up 138 percent Woertz's near nine-year tenure as CEO of Archer Daniels Midland ended in December, though she still holds the position of chairman at the company, which makes vegetable oil, ethanol and ingredients used in packaged foods and drinks. Her compensation included $501,560 for relocation expenses after ADM moved its global headquarters to Chicago from Decatur, Illinois. No. 9: Irene Rosenfeld, Mondelez International, $15.9 million, up 14 percent The maker of Oreo cookies, Cadbury chocolate and Trident gum raised Rosenfeld's overall pay by 14 percent last year. Shareholders didn't fare as well. The company's stock rose 3 percent, compared with a gain of 11.4 percent for the broader stock market. No. 10: Ellen Kullman, DuPont, $13.1 million, down 1 percent Kullman spent much of last year fending off an attempt by activist investor Nelson Peltz to gain more influence over the 212-year old chemical company. She prevailed in May this year after shareholders voted against his campaign. But the fight showed that DuPont needed to do a better job of explaining its transformation from a traditional chemical maker to a faster-growing company focused on agricultural products and advanced materials, she said.
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:37 am by PAUL WISEMAN, AP Economics Writer
 (AP) — A weak U.S. economy pulled down consumer sentiment in May. The University of Michigan says its index of consumer sentiment dropped to 90.7 from 95.9 in April. The May reading was the lowest since November. Consumers of all ages and income levels were gloomier this month. And they were less confident both about current economic conditions and the future. But Richard Curtin, chief economist of the surveys, noted that the index has averaged 94.6 the first five months of 2015, highest since 2004. On Tuesday, the Conference Board, a business group, reported that its measure of consumer spirits showed modest improvement in May. Its consumer confidence index rose to 95.4 from 94.3 in April. The Conference Board credited an improved job market: Employers added a healthy 223,000 jobs in March, up from an unimpressive 85,000 in March. And unemployment tumbled to 5.4 percent last month, lowest since May 2008. Still, consumers have reasons to be cautious about the economy and their own financial wellbeing. The Commerce Department reported Friday that the U.S. economy fell at a 0.7 percent annual pace the first three months of the year, hurt by severe winter weather and a widening trade deficit. And gasoline prices have been rising after hitting a low of $2.03 a gallon in late January. Prices at the pump are up to $2.74 a gallon from $2.56 a gallon a month ago, according to AAA.
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:37 am by BRIAN MELLEY and 
MICHAEL R. BLOOD, Associated Press
(AP) — Emergency workers and officials from a pipeline operator had gathered last week to train for the worst — an oil spill — when a 911 call came in reporting a noxious smell at a nearby beach. Santa Barbara County firefighters rushed to the shoreline, where they discovered oil flowing across a beach and into the Pacific. What was supposed to be a drill turned real. "It was very black. You couldn't see the sand anymore," fire Capt. Craig Vanderzwaag recalled after arriving at the leak May 19. "You could see rolling waves with black oil lapping up on the beach." By the time the firefighters traced the source of the spill to a ruptured underground pipeline, thousands of gallons of crude had escaped. As oil fouled the sand and water, firefighters wielding shovels and axes moved dirt and rocks to prevent more of it from spilling into a drainage ditch, but the leak quickly stretched 9 miles along the coast. What was done that day to detect and stop the spill and protect some of the most fabled coastline in California has come under scrutiny, as officials continue cleaning up a leak estimated at up to 101,000 gallons and try to figure out what went wrong. U.S. Sens. Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein of California labeled the response to the spill "insufficient" in a letter Thursday to the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. The senators questioned why the line lacked an automatic shut-off valve and whether some workers were left on the sidelines while the leak spread. "We need answers about why this happened, why the response was insufficient and what can be done to prevent another tragic spill like this from happening in the future," said the letter, which also was signed by Massachusetts Sen. Edward J. Markey, a fellow Democrat. "We are concerned that insufficient preparation may have slowed down the response effort," they wrote. In reply, Plains All American Pipeline said it was a "competent and experienced operator." "We train regularly for situations such as this, hoping that they will never happen. However, in a real event, no one is fully satisfied with the speed of response," the company said in a statement late Thursday. "Upon confirming the release, we immediately activated our emergency response plan and marshaled critical resources to the scene, scaling up those resources quickly as we better understood the cleanup requirements." Among the senators' concerns: It took Plains about 90 minutes after the spill to notify the National Response Center, a clearinghouse for reports of hazardous-material releases that coordinates responses, according to disclosures so far. Additionally, Plains had reported problems with the line earlier that day. "We are concerned that Plains Pipeline may not have detected this spill or reported it to federal officials as quickly as possible, and that these delays could have exacerbated the extent of the damage to the environment," the senators wrote. Linda Krop, chief counsel of the Environmental Defense Center, said she was at the shore until 10 p.m. the day of the spill and nothing was being done to prevent crude from washing into the sea. "The response was extremely tardy that allowed oil to get in the water where it will never be fully recovered," Krop said. "Waves were washing oil off the beach and off the rocks and nothing was being done." Coast Guard Capt. Jennifer Williams said the effectiveness of the response will be evaluated in the investigation. She said it took awhile to get the cleanup ramped up because people had to come from out of town. "During the early stages, people didn't even know how much was on the beach. People were getting to the scene and trying to ascertain how big a problem it was," she said. Officials said earlier Thursday that the ruptured section of pipeline had been removed for analysis. The spill marred the same stretch of shoreline as a 1969 oil platform blowout that helped spawn the modern environmental movement. That spill spewed more than 3 million gallons of crude into the ocean, spoiled miles of beaches and killed thousands of birds and other wildlife.
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:34 am by Business Journal staff
Fresno State-based nonprofit radio station, KFSR will host its first ever live music festival on June 27.  KFSR Fest kicks off at University President Joseph I. Castro’s house, 4411 N. Van Ness Blvd., in Old Fig Garden at 11 a.m. The event will feature three live bands on three stages throughout the day including a jazz, blues and alternative group.  Guest DJ opportunities are available through sponsorship donations and the winners will schedule a date to co-host an hour of radio programming and choose music for the show.  Seating is festival style and attendees are encouraged to bring lawn chairs and picnic blankets. No umbrellas or coolers will be allowed into the festival. Tickets are $25 and include a picnic lunch. KFSR is a listener-supported, non-commercial public radio station listened to and operated by Fresno State. The station broadcasts at 2,600 watts and can be heard throughout Fresno and Clovis at 90.7 on the FM dial. As a licensed 501(c)3 organization, contributions made to the station are tax-deductible. 
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:32 am by LARRY NEUMEISTER, Associated Press
(AP) — Prosecutors are asking a Manhattan judge to sentence a San Francisco man who created the online drug-peddling site Silk Road to decades in prison, while the defendant is asking to be freed soon enough to show he's a changed man. Ross William Ulbricht, 31, is set to be sentenced Friday following his February conviction in federal court. In a letter to U.S. District Judge Katherine Forrest, Ulbricht said he regrets what he calls a "very naive and costly idea." He said he ruined his life and destroyed his future by what he now calls his "terrible mistake," and he promised to no longer be the "rebellious risk taker" he was if he is given less than the life sentence recommended by the Probation Department. "Please leave a small light at the end of the tunnel, an excuse to stay healthy, an excuse to dream of better days ahead, and a chance to redeem myself in the free world before I meet my maker," he wrote. Prosecutors, though, asked for a sentence substantially longer than the 20-year mandatory minimum, saying Ulbricht "developed a blueprint for a new way to use the Internet to undermine the law and facilitate criminal transactions" before he was nabbed in a San Francisco library in 2013, two years after launching Silk Road. He was convicted of seven drug and conspiracy counts by a jury that deliberated only three hours. Prosecutors said Ulbricht collected over $18 million in bitcoin commissions operating a website with thousands of listings under categories like "Cannabis," ''Psychedelics" and "Stimulants." They said he brokered more than 1 million drug deals worth $213 million. To support a lengthy sentence, prosecutors said in a legal brief that Ulbricht's massive narcotics-trafficking enterprise had resulted in at least six drug-related deaths, including a 27-year-old Microsoft employee and a 16-year-old boy in Perth, Australia. They also said he solicited multiple murders for hire in attempts to eliminate perceived threats, though authorities found no evidence anyone was killed. "The site enabled thousands of drug dealers to expand their markets from the sidewalk to cyberspace, and thereby reach countless customers whom they never could have found on the street. The consequence was to vastly expand access to illegal drugs," prosecutors said.
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:26 am by BRANDON BAILEY, AP Technology Writer
(AP) — Apple has bought a company that makes augmented-reality software, which adds information or images to real-world scenes when viewed through a special headset or even a smartphone camera. It's the latest sign that major tech companies see big potential for products that let users view the world with extra features added by technology. Apple, Google, Facebook and Microsoft are all working on augmented- or virtual-reality products. Augmented reality can add hand-drawn sketches, navigational directions, historic video or computer-generated, three-dimensional images to a real-world scene. Virtual reality can make viewers feel as if they are immersed in an artificial world. Apple on Thursday confirmed the purchase of Munich-based Metaio for an undisclosed sum but did not say what it plans to do with the technology.

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Written on 05/29/2015, 8:37 am by BRIAN MELLEY and 
MICHAEL R. BLOOD, Associated Press
(AP) — Emergency workers and officials...
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:32 am by LARRY NEUMEISTER, Associated Press
(AP) — Prosecutors are asking a...
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:26 am by BRANDON BAILEY, AP Technology Writer
(AP) — Apple has bought a company that...
Written on 05/28/2015, 12:39 pm by MICHELE KAYAL, Associated Press
At noon on a recent Wednesday in May,...

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Written on 05/29/2015, 8:45 am by MARTIN CRUTSINGER, AP Economics Writer
(AP) — The U.S. economy shrank at a 0.7...
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:42 am by NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS, Associated Press
(AP) — A record crop of apples, coupled...
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:40 am by STEVE ROTHWELL, AP Business Writer
(AP) — Female CEOs are outpacing their...
Written on 05/29/2015, 8:37 am by PAUL WISEMAN, AP Economics Writer
 (AP) — A weak U.S. economy pulled down...