TODAY

– July 29, 2014

Foreclosure activity drops in Madera County

Foreclosure activity rose throughout the state in October.Foreclosure activity rose throughout the state in October.Madera County was the one bright spot when it came to foreclosures in October as the rest of the Central Valley saw spikes in new filings.

According to new data from Property Radar, there were 34 notices of default filed in Madera County during the month, down from 50 in September and 87 last year.

Notices of sale, which serve as a homeowner's final warning before a home goes to auction, totaled 29 in October compared to 39 the prior month and 96 in October 2012.

There were 229 notices of default filed in Fresno County during the month compared to 202 the month before and 434 in October 2012, while notices of sale totaled 207 in October compared to 204 in September and 473 a year ago.

Tulare County saw 139 notices of default in September, up from 114 the prior month but down from 199 last year. Notices of sale dropped from 240 a year ago and 105 in September to 96 last month.

There were 39 notices of default filed in Kings County during October compared to 34 in September and 61 a year ago, while notices of sale fell to 33 from 37 the prior month and 69 in October 2012.

Throughout California, notices of default totaled totaled 7,869 in October, up 15.7 percent from 6,802 the prior month but down 45.2 percent from 14,358 a year ago.

Notices of sale came in at 7,215 in October, down 4.1 percent from 6,928 the month before and 59.2 percent from 17,700 last year.

Of the 8,720 homes that went to foreclosure auction in October, 5,676 were cancelled, 1,934 went back to the bank and 1,110 were sold to a third-party buyer.

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Written on 07/29/2014, 11:29 am by Business Journal staff
nef-named-new-fresno-state-vice-provostA veteran Fresno State professor and administrator has been named as Fresno State's new vice provost.
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:21 am by SCOTT SMITH, Associated Press
(AP) — A California man who was charged after refusing treatment for his tuberculosis was found and arrested, a prosecutor said Tuesday. Eduardo Rosas Cruz, 25, was arrested late Monday in Kern County, San Joaquin County Deputy District Attorney Stephen Taylor said. Before Rosas Cruz can be sent back to San Joaquin County, he has to be medically cleared, which could take weeks, Taylor said. Authorities last week obtained an arrest warrant for Rosas Cruz, saying he was diagnosed with tuberculosis in March after going to San Joaquin General Hospital's emergency room with a severe cough. Medical staff at the hospital told him to stay in a Stockton motel room, where a health worker would deliver his medication and watch him take it. But officials say he left. Rosas Cruz is a transient and comes from an area of Mexico known for a drug-resistant strain of TB, authorities said. He was arrested on the San Joaquin County warrant during a traffic stop in Lamont, a community about 15 miles southeast of Bakersfield, said Ray Pruitt, a spokesman for the Kern County Sheriff's Office. Officers took him to the Kern Medical Center in Bakersfield. TB can spread through the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. The disease can be deadly. Taylor said the goal of prosecuting a tuberculosis patient through the criminal courts is not to punish him, but to protect the public. He said Rosas Cruz refused to cooperate with officials. "When somebody has behaved like this, it's time to go in-patient," Taylor said. In court papers filed in support of the warrant, public health officials said Rosas Cruz resisted treatment from the start. He also used crack cocaine and methamphetamine, officials said, adding that he could develop the drug-resistant strain if he hasn't already. By law, health officials can't force a patient to be treated for tuberculosis, but officials can use the courts to isolate him from the public. That is when officials offer treatment.
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:19 am by SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer
(AP) — Along much of America's coasts, the type of flooding that is more annoying than dangerous has jumped more than fivefold in the last 50 years, the federal government reported Monday. Scientists blame rising seas, saying this is one of the ways global warming is changing everyday lives. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration studied coastal trends in what it calls nuisance flooding, where no one is hurt but people have to deal with flooded roads and buildings. While scientists and the public spend a lot of time dealing with giant events, such as a hurricane, it is minor floods that people feel more often, though not as severely, said NOAA's Margaret Davidson. "It's the stuff that keeps you from conducting your business or picking up your kids from school," Davidson said. "It is clear that changing climate and weather patterns will cause us to be increasingly inconvenienced and challenged in our everyday lives." Oceanographer William Sweet looked at coastal sites across the nation, focusing on 25 places with records that go back beyond 1950. Fifty years ago the 25 sites averaged about 2.5 days of minor flooding a year. Now those places average about 14 days a year. All 25 of those locations saw increases in the number of minor flood days; 22 of them saw more than doubling of nuisance flooding since the late 1950s and early 1960s. Those 25 cities have also seen sea level rise nearly half a foot since 1963. The biggest increases are in the mid-Atlantic region. Charleston, South Carolina, San Francisco and Port Isabel, Texas, also showed more than four-fold increases in flooding. Annapolis, Maryland, had the biggest percentage increase. From 1957 to 1963 it averaged 3.6 minor flood days a year; now it averages more than 39 a year. In 2011, Maryland's capital had 66 minor flood days. University of Maryland environmental scientist Donald Boesch, who wasn't part of the report, said this type of event is probably more meaningful to people than the bigger and less frequent storms. He noted that sea level has risen about 8 inches in Annapolis since 1971. "Simply stated, the cause of the increase in inundation frequency is sea level rise attributable to global warming," Boesch said in an email. Sweet said sinking land and building construction are factors in the increased flooding, but not nearly as much as rising seas. "It's going to become the new normal," Sweet said. "That is how we can identify with the impacts of sea level rise." Sweet looked at increase nuisance flooding in Boston; Providence, Rhode Island; New London, Connecticut; Battery Park, Kings Point, and Montauk, New York; Atlantic City and Sandy Hook, New Jersey; Philadelphia; Lewes, Delaware; Baltimore and Annapolis, Maryland; Washington; Norfolk, Virginia; Wilmington, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Fort Pulaski, Georgia; Fernandina Beach, Key West and Mayport, Florida; Port Isabel, Texas; La Jolla, California; San Francisco, Seattle and Honolulu. ___Online:NOAA report: http://1.usa.gov/1lOCkHi
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:17 am by GARANCE BURKE, Associated Press Writer
(AP) — Top California regulators communicated often and enthusiastically with executives at Pacific Gas & Electric Co., even offering unsolicited advice on handling the media while they presided over a case to decide how much the utility should pay for a deadly explosion in a San Francisco Bay Area suburb, according to a trove of emails released Monday. The 7,000 pages of emails between leaders at PG&E and California Public Utilities Commission President Michael Peevey and his staff were released as the result of a lawsuit filed by the city of San Bruno. The commission is responsible for punishing PG&E in the wake of the 2010 pipeline blast that claimed eight lives, injured dozens of people and laid waste to a suburban neighborhood — a disaster federal investigators said could have been averted. In an April message from Peevey to Brian Cherry, PG&E's vice president of regulatory relations, Peevey offered the executive advice about improving public relations surrounding the federal criminal indictment of the utility. "PG&E's decision to issue a press release last week anticipating all this only meant that the public got to read two big stories rather than one. I think this was inept," Peevey wrote. San Bruno officials called Monday for Peevey to step down from the commission and sent a letter to Gov. Jerry Brown asking for Peevey to be fired. "There is a very cozy relationship between the PUC and PG&E, and the results of that cozy relationship killed eight people," San Bruno Mayor Jim Ruane said at a news conference on the commission's steps. The emails show "it was illegal, improper and has to change." The city's attorney Britt Strottman filed two motions with the powerful state agency calling for Peevey to be removed from the proceedings regarding the utility and saying San Bruno should be penalized for the communications. The city also reserves the right to pursue the matter in state court, she said. PG&E President Chris Johns said in a statement the company is required to communicate regularly with the commission. "The company is committed to the highest ethical standards," Johns said. The commission is focused on resolving numerous internal legal proceedings aimed at issuing fines against PG&E and improving pipeline safety, said commission spokeswoman Terrie Prosper. "The CPUC takes seriously all allegations of bias and rule violations and will evaluate the motions," she said in a statement.
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:08 am by 
ERICA WERNER, Associated Press
(AP) — House Republicans have agreed to vote on a slimmed-down bill to address the immigration crisis on the U.S.-Mexico border by sending in National Guard troops and speeding unaccompanied migrant youths back to Central America. The bill will cost $659 million through the end of this fiscal year, far smaller than the $3.7 billion requested by President Barack Obama and a sharp reduction from the $1.5 billion initially proposed by the House spending committee. The cuts were designed to win over skeptical conservatives and give lawmakers something they could pass before leaving Washington at the end of this week for their annual August recess. "I think there's sufficient support in the House to move this bill," House Speaker John Boehner told reporters Tuesday after meeting with rank-and-file lawmakers on the issue. "We have a little more work to do though." Boehner said the bill would come to a vote on Thursday. Numerous House Republicans have said in recent weeks that they did not want to go back to their districts to face voters without acting to deal with the crisis of tens of thousands of kids and teens showing up at the South Texas border, many fleeing vicious gangs and trying to reunite with family members. Lawmakers said Tuesday that the measure appeared to enjoy widespread support, although some conservatives said they remained opposed. "Frankly, we need to show that we can act and act thoughtfully, responsibly and quickly," said Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla. "Clean up the mess that the administration has created. I think the worst thing for us would have been to write a blank check which the president wanted us to do."
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:06 am by MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press
(AP) — A federal appeals court has upheld new government rules that require labels on packaged steaks, ribs and other cuts of meat to say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered. The meat industry has attempted to block the rules, saying they are costly to comply with and they provide no health benefits to the consumer. The full appellate panel heard the case after a three-judge appeals panel ruled against the industry but suggested that the full court may want to review its decision. Judge Stephen F. Williams wrote for the full court that the government's interest in the labels is "substantial" because there is a long history of such disclosures, a consumer interest in knowing a food's origin and health concerns if there is an illness outbreak.
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:05 am by JOSH BOAK, AP Economics Writer
(AP) — More than 35 percent of Americans have debts and unpaid bills that have been reported to collection agencies, according to a study released Tuesday by the Urban Institute. These consumers fall behind on credit cards or hospital bills. Their mortgages, auto loans or student debt pile up, unpaid. Even past-due gym membership fees or cellphone contracts can end up with a collection agency, potentially hurting credit scores and job prospects, said Caroline Ratcliffe, a senior fellow at the Washington-based think tank. "Roughly, every third person you pass on the street is going to have debt in collections," Ratcliffe said. "It can tip employers' hiring decisions, or whether or not you get that apartment." The study found that 35.1 percent of people with credit records had been reported to collections for debt that averaged $5,178, based on September 2013 records. The study points to a disturbing trend: The share of Americans in collections has remained relatively constant, even as the country as a whole has whittled down the size of its credit card debt since the official end of the Great Recession in the middle of 2009. As a share of people's income, credit card debt has reached its lowest level in more than a decade, according to the American Bankers Association. People increasingly pay off balances each month. Just 2.44 percent of card accounts are overdue by 30 days or more, versus the 15-year average of 3.82 percent. Yet roughly the same percentage of people are still getting reported for unpaid bills, according to the Urban Institute study performed in conjunction with researchers from the Consumer Credit Research Institute. Their figures nearly match the 36.5 percent of people in collections reported by a 2004 Federal Reserve analysis. All of this has reshaped the economy. The collections industry employs 140,000 workers who recover around $50 billion each year, according to a separate study published this year by the Federal Reserve's Philadelphia bank branch. Health care-related bills account for 37.9 percent of the debts collected, according to a new report commissioned by the Association of Credit and Collection Professionals. Student loan debt represents another 25.2 percent and credit cards make up 10.1 percent, with the rest of the collections going for local governments, retailers, telecoms and utilities. The delinquent debt is overwhelmingly concentrated in Southern and Western states. Texas cities have a large share of their populations being reported to collection agencies: Dallas (44.3 percent); El Paso (44.4 percent), Houston (43.7 percent), McAllen (51.7 percent) and San Antonio (44.5 percent). Almost half of Las Vegas residents— many of whom bore the brunt of the housing bust that sparked the recession— have debt in collections. Other Southern cities have a disproportionate number of their people facing debt collectors, including Orlando and Jacksonville, Florida; Memphis, Tennessee; Columbia, South Carolina; and Jackson, Mississippi. A few major factors appear to be driving the delinquencies, said Eric Salazar, the Texas and Florida manager for the credit counseling agency Greenpath. First, many of these workers have low-paying jobs in construction and services, in addition to minimal education on their finances. "There is not the income growth to save and they have to make survival decisions," Salazar said. "You make the decision to pay for the roof over your head and to feed your family and that's all you can afford to do." Secondly, these states are home to retirees who live on fixed incomes and may struggle to pay medical bills, Salazar said. Other cities have populations that have largely managed to repay their bills on time. Just 20.1 percent of Minneapolis residents have debts in collection. Boston, Honolulu and San Jose, California, are similarly low. Only about 20 percent of Americans with credit records have any debt at all. Yet high debt levels don't always lead to more delinquencies, since the debt largely comes from mortgages. An average San Jose resident has $97,150 in total debt, with 84 percent of it tied to a mortgage. But because incomes and real estate values are higher in the technology hub, those residents are less likely to be delinquent. By contrast, the average person in the Texas city of McAllen has only $23,546 in debt, yet more than half of the population has debt in collections, more than anywhere else in the United States. The Urban Institute's Ratcliffe said that stagnant incomes are key to why some parts of the country are struggling to repay their debt. Wages have barely kept up with inflation during the five-year recovery, according to Labor Department figures. And a separate measure by Wells Fargo found that after-tax income fell for the bottom 20 percent of earners during the same period.
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:01 am by RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press
(AP) — The price may be high but so is demand. A new $1,000-per-pill drug has become the treatment of choice for Americans with hepatitis C, a liver-wasting disease that affects more than 3 million. Even with insurers reluctant to pay, Sovaldi prescriptions have eclipsed those for all other hepatitis C pills combined in a matter of months, new data from IMS Health indicate. The promise of a real cure, with fewer nasty side effects, has prompted thousands to get treated. But clinical and commercial successes are also triggering scrutiny for the drug's manufacturer, California-based Gilead Sciences Inc., which just reported second-quarter profits of $3.66 billion, or 56 percent. Two senators have unearthed documents that suggest the initial developers of Sovaldi considered pricing it at less than half as much. The health insurance industry is publicly scolding Gilead, and state Medicaid programs are pushing back. The repercussions go beyond one drug and one disease. A number of promising cancer medications near approval could be drawn into the storm over costs. "You can't put too fine a point on the sort of moral dilemma that we have here," said Michael Kleinrock, director of the IMS Institute, which studies prescription drug trends. "This is something that the research-based pharmaceutical industry reaches for all the time: a cure. But when they achieve one, can we afford it?" New data from IMS Health, the parent company of the institute, illustrate Sovaldi's impact since its December debut: —The number of pharmacy prescriptions for all hepatitis C pills has soared, highlighting demand. In May, more than 48,000 prescriptions were filled for four such medications, with Sovaldi accounting for three-fourths of the total. Compare that to prescriptions for May 2013, before Sovaldi became available, which totaled about 6,200. —In Sovaldi's first 30 weeks on the market, 62,000 new patients tried the drug, nearly three times as many as had tried an earlier medication that showed promise. That makes Sovaldi the most successful launch for any hepatitis C drug. Gilead expects to have a successor soon that will make treatment easier to tolerate, because it won't require patients to take companion medications with strong side effects. —The weekly number of new patients going on Sovaldi has been gradually slowing, from more than 2,900 in February and March to about 1,600-1,800 in late June and early July. Kleinrock said that could indicate that pent-up initial demand is giving way to steadier levels, or it could mean that insurers are limiting access to protect their budgets. Hepatitis C surpassed AIDS as a cause of death in the U.S. in 2007, claiming an estimated 15,000 lives that year. The illness is complex, with distinct virus types requiring different treatments. While it advances gradually, it can ultimately destroy the liver, and transplants average $577,000. The cost of a 12-week regimen of Sovaldi along with two companion medications that patients must also take is around $100,000. Competing regimens with other drugs cost in the mid- to high five figures, and some are far less effective and harder to tolerate. Hepatitis C is a public health concern, since the disease can be transmitted by contact with infected blood, by drug users sharing needles, and sometimes through sexual activity. Many people are unaware that they carry the virus. Health officials advise all baby boomers to get tested. At Mount Sinai Health System's liver clinic in New York City, patient advocate Angela Woody said Sovaldi has brightened the outlook for patients. But it takes effort to get insurance approval. "We have had to jump through a great deal of hoops," Woody said. "We have two patients who applied in January and did not actually go on the medication until April." Sovaldi's implications for Medicare and Medicaid costs have prompted rare bipartisan cooperation in Congress on a health care issue. Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., and Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, are asking Gilead for a detailed explanation of its pricing. Wyden chairs the Finance Committee, which oversees health insurance programs, and Grassley is a veteran of drug safety investigations. The senators say their staffs found public documents that call into question Gilead's $84,000 price for a full course of Sovaldi treatment, for the most common type of hepatitis C. In 2011 filings with federal regulators, the company that originally developed Sovaldi estimated a treatment price of $36,000. That figure was developed during Gilead's negotiations to buy the original developer, Pharmasset. Gilead spokeswoman Amy Flood said the company has no comment. But Gilead vice president Gregg Alton recently addressed the issue at a public forum sponsored by the American Enterprise Institute. "To suggest that a cure for a disease like hepatitis C should be priced at $36,000 ... would put a huge disincentive on investing in cures for our industry," he said. Gilead took on most of the challenge — and risk — of getting government approval for Sovaldi, Alton added. He suggested another standard for measuring the value of Sovaldi, something called "cost-per-cure," that makes Sovaldi look like a bargain. The older hepatitis C treatments take longer and are less effective, and Alton estimated their cost-per-cure at somewhere between $150,000 and $200,000. Included are companion drugs that patients must also take. Sovaldi gets that down to $115,000 per cure, said Alton. "So it is actually, on a per-cure basis, much less costly."
Written on 07/29/2014, 9:59 am by Business Journal Staff
Philanthropy Inspired by the Needs of our Community (PINC) Founder Annie Friesen, current PINC President Kirin Sran, Vice President Emily Silveira and other PINC members today presented a check to Transitions Children’s Services for $50,000. Funds were raised at the June 7 “Lights, Camera, PINC” event attended by nearly 500 people. The $50,000 amount is nearly $15,000 more than PINC raised at last year’s event. Since 2009, PINC has raised a total of $189,500 through its annual fundraising events benefitting Angel Babies of Hinds Hospice (2009), Marjaree Mason Center (2010), Make-A-Wish Foundation of Central California (2011), Break The Barriers (2012), Catholic Charities — Diocese of Fresno (2013) and Transitions Children’s Services (2014). The check presentation was held atTransitions Children’s Services office, 1945 N. Helm Ave., Suite 101, in Fresno. PINC selected Transitions Children’s Services as its 2014 beneficiary for its annual fundraising event held in June. The goal was to raise $35,000 to donate to Transitions Children’s Services, a relatively new non-profit whose purpose is to provide quality, culturally competent treatment foster care and extended foster care services to children, families and non-minor dependents in the child welfare and foster care system.
Written on 07/29/2014, 9:57 am by MICHAEL TARM, Associated Press
(AP) — The NCAA agreed Tuesday to settle a class-action head-injury lawsuit by creating a $70 million fund to diagnose thousands of current and former college athletes to determine if they suffered brain trauma playing football, hockey, soccer and other contact sports. College sports' governing body also agreed to implement a single return-to-play policy spelling out how all teams must treat players who received head blows, according to a Tuesday filing in U.S. District Court in Chicago. Critics have accused the NCAA of giving too much discretion to hundreds of individual schools about when athletes can go back into games, putting them at risk. Unlike a proposed settlement in a similar lawsuit against the NFL, this deal stops short of setting aside money to pay players who suffered brain trauma. Instead, athletes can sue individually for damages and the NCAA-funded tests to gauge the extent of neurological injuries could establish grounds for doing that. The filing serves as notice to the federal judge overseeing the class-action case that the parties struck a deal after nearly a year of negotiations. In addition to football, ice hockey and soccer, the settlement also applies to all men and women who participated in basketball, wrestling, field hockey and lacrosse. Joseph Siprut, the lead plaintiffs' attorney who spearheaded talks with the NCAA, said the sometimes-tough negotiations ended with a deal that will make college athletics safer. "I wouldn't say these changes solve the safety problems, but they do reduce the risks," the Chicago attorney said Tuesday. "It's changed college sports forever." The NCAA hailed the settlement. "This agreement's proactive measures will ensure student-athletes have access to high quality medical care by physicians with experience in the diagnosis, treatment and management of concussions," NCAA chief medical officer Brian Hainline said in a statement. Siprut added that stricter oversight and return-to-play rules should help ensure the viability of football by allaying the fears of parents who are currently inclined to not let their kids play. "Changes were necessary to preserve the talent well of kids that feeds the game of football," he said. "Absent these kinds of changes, the sport will die." There is no cutoff date for when athletes must have played a designated sport at one of the more than 1,000 NCAA member schools to qualify for the medical exams. That means all athletes currently playing and those who participated decades ago could undergo the tests and potentially follow up with damage claims. To keep the NCAA from having to hold unwieldy talks with multiple plaintiffs, 10 lawsuits filed from Georgia and South Carolina to Minnesota and Missouri were consolidated into the one case in Chicago, where the first lawsuit was filed in 2011. Combined, the suits identified several dozen athletes by name as having suffered brain trauma. The lead plaintiff is Adrian Arrington, a former safety at Eastern Illinois. He said he endured five concussions while playing, some so severe he has said he couldn't recognize his parents afterward. Subsequent headaches, memory loss, seizures and depression made it difficult to work or even care for his children, filings said. Another named plaintiff is former Central Arkansas wide receiver Derek K. Owens. After several concussions, he said he found he could no longer retain what he had just studied. His symptoms became so severe he dropped out of school in 2011, telling his mother: "I feel like a 22-year-old with Alzheimer's." Among other settlement terms, all athletes will take baseline neurological tests to start each year to help doctors determine the severity of any concussion during the season; concussion education will be mandated for coaches and athletes; and a new, independent Medical Science Committee will oversee the medical testing. The NCAA admits no wrongdoing in the settlement and has denied understating the dangers of concussions. As proof it has tried to mitigate the risks, it has cited recent changes in equipment, medical practices and playing rules, including ones prohibiting football players from targeting an opponent's head or neck. The NCAA also announced in May a three-year, $30 million concussion study co-funded by the U.S. Defense Department. Plans call for initial data collection on about 7,200 athletes from 12 colleges, increasing to 37,000 athletes at 30 sites, with the aim of better understanding concussions and developing better prevention methods. The settlement is still subject to approval by U.S. District Judge John Lee, in a process that could take months. He must grant preliminary approval and then, after affected athletes weigh in, give a final OK. Plaintiffs' filings say the number of athletes who may require testing to learn if they suffered long-term damage runs into the tens of thousands. They cite NCAA figures that from 2004 to 2009 alone, 29,225 NCAA athletes suffered concussions — about 16,000 in football, 5,751 in women's soccer and 3,374 in men's soccer. Internal emails unsealed in the lawsuit illustrate how pressure mounted on the NCAA over the issue. In a Feb. 23, 2010, email, the NCAA's director of government relations, Abe Frank, wondered about debates elsewhere, including in Congress, about recommended new safeguards for young children playing contact sports. "Do you think this renewed emphasis on youth sports will increase the pressure on the NCAA to do more at the college level?" he asks in the email sent to the NCAA's then-director of health and safety. David Klossner responded bluntly a few hours later. "Well since we don't currently require anything all steps are higher than ours," he wrote. Later that year, the NCAA did establish a new head-injury policy that requires each school to have a concussion management plan on hand and it states that athletes should be kept from play for at least a day after a concussion; it also requires players to sign a statement "accepting responsibility for reporting their injuries." But plaintiffs argued schools put too much of the onus on athletes with little understanding of concussions to self-report injuries. And they blamed a tendency of some teams to hurry concussed players back into games according to patchy, uneven plans and the NCAA's lax enforcement of the concussions policy. In a 2012 deposition, Klossner conceded the NCAA provides virtually no oversight of concussion management plans and that schools aren't required to submit them to the NCAA. Asked if any schools had been disciplined for having subpar plans, Klossner said, "Not to my knowledge." Prior to the settlement, plaintiffs were scathing about how the NCAA handled the head injury issue for decades. Instead of adopting stricter protections for athletes, the lawsuit said the NCAA chose "to sacrifice them on an altar of money and profits," an approach that occurred even though the NCAA had known for at least a decade "of the correlation between concussions and depression, dementia and early onset Alzheimer's disease." The plaintiffs cited a 2010 internal NCAA survey that found almost half of college trainers put athletes with signs of a concussion back into the same game.

Latest State News

Written on 07/29/2014, 10:19 am by SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer
(AP) — Along much of America's coasts,...
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:17 am by GARANCE BURKE, Associated Press Writer
(AP) — Top California regulators...
Written on 07/29/2014, 9:49 am by BRIAN MAHONEY, AP Basketball Writer
(AP) — The NBA and the Los Angeles...
Written on 07/28/2014, 12:29 pm by The Associated Press
(AP) — Closing arguments are underway...

Latest National News

Written on 07/29/2014, 10:08 am by 
ERICA WERNER, Associated Press
(AP) — House Republicans have agreed to...
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:06 am by MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press
(AP) — A federal appeals court has...
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:05 am by JOSH BOAK, AP Economics Writer
(AP) — More than 35 percent of...
Written on 07/29/2014, 10:01 am by RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press
(AP) — The price may be high but so is...