TODAY

– August 27, 2014

It's what's for dinner, big-time

U.S. red meat producers set a record in November, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture's California Livestock Review, producing 4.33 billion pounds, a 9% increase from the 3.96 billion pounds produced in November 2009.

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Latest Local News

Written on 08/27/2014, 11:21 am by Ben Keller
With among the highest poverty rates in the country, the Central Valley has been a boon for Comcast’s Internet Essentials program, offering high-speed...
Written on 08/27/2014, 11:12 am by TERESA M. WALKER, AP Pro Football Writer
(AP) — Ravens running back Ray Rice is sitting out two games for domestic violence. A positive marijuana test triggered a yearlong ban for Browns wide receiver Josh Gordon, costing him the 2014 season. Critics of the NFL's arbitrary policy toward domestic violence point to the contrast between the punishments and say it's time for the league to crack down on players who hurt women. Three members of Congress wrote NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell asking him to reconsider Rice's suspension, the governor of Maine says he'll boycott the league, and numerous groups that advocate for women and families condemned the penalty as too lenient. League officials may soon take action on the matter. A person familiar with the NFL's plans says the league is looking into increasing punishments for players involved in domestic violence. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because no announcement had been made on such a decision. "The first time with marijuana is different from the first time you are knocking your wife unconscious," said Judy Harris Kluger, executive director of Sanctuary for Families and a former judge in New York City. "It's not what they did was such a small sort of slap on the wrist. Punishment to me, they should have suspended for a season at least and let him appeal. At least you send a message that this is not tolerated, that this matters." Rice's suspension begins Saturday, a punishment handed down after grainy video showed him dragging his then-fiancee off a casino elevator unconscious Feb. 15. He has not divulged what happened in the elevator except to call his actions "totally inexcusable." His assault charges could be expunged once he completes a diversion program. So the NFL gave him the only punishment he likely faces in a suspension and a fine that totals more than $500,000. "My daughter is 2 years old now. One day she's going to know the power of Google. Me having to explain that to her, what happened that night, that's something I have to live with the rest of my life," Rice said at training camp. By comparison, Washington safety Brandon Meriweather was handed a two-game suspension for a hit during an exhibition game for a sixth violation of player safety rules. Broncos kicker Matt Prater has been suspended four games for violating terms of the league's alcohol program as a repeat offender. Gordon was suspended for two games last season, and his appeal of his one-year ban for violating the substance abuse policy at least a third time was rejected Wednesday. The NFL has guidelines bargained with the NFL Players Association setting out penalties for using illegal and performance-enhancing drugs. Domestic violence, covered under personal conduct, has been left to the discretion of the commissioner. The NFL's personal code of conduct makes it clear that domestic violence will not be tolerated, Kluger says. But she says the league didn't follow that code in punishing Rice. "It boggles the mind that they did not act in a way that ... sent a message that this is more serious," said Kluger, who helped oversee New York putting in courts that deal specifically with domestic violence. This is not a new issue for the NFL. Since January 2000, 77 players have been involved in 85 domestic violence incidents with six being cut by their teams, according to USA Today's NFL Arrests Database. The NFL suspended six players for one game each, and Rice now is the second player to be suspended for two games. Goodell has defended the Rice suspension, saying the league can't just "make up the discipline" and needs to be consistent. He also said Rice took responsibility and had not been in trouble before. U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy of Connecticut and Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin sent a letter to Goodell and Ravens general manager Ozzie Newsome decrying Rice's punishment and suggesting the Ravens also discipline the running back. "The decision to suspend Mr. Rice for a mere two games sends the inescapable message that the NFL does not take domestic or intimate-partner violence with the seriousness they deserve," the letter said. The NFL has yet to punish Carolina Pro Bowl defensive end Greg Hardy, who is awaiting a jury trial on his conviction for attacking his ex-girlfriend in his apartment in May. A judge gave him a 60-day suspended jail sentence and 18 months' probation, which he is appealing. What the NFL does next is being watched closely, according to a consultant who helps train police, lawyers and judges on domestic violence. "I hope they reflect and self-assess themselves and come out and say, 'We want to be the national standard for how we feel about violence against women,'" said Mark Wynn, a former Nashville police lieutenant working to prevent violence against women for 30 years. Goodell emphasized Rice's punishment was for a first offense. Wynn says a crisis line director told him victims don't usually call for help until the fifth incident. "The stronger voice of the NFL about this that we have no tolerance for violence against women, no tolerance of coercion, no tolerance of objectifying women, that to me would be a real pivotal moment for professional sports where they say enough is enough," Wynn said. ___AP Pro Football Writer Howard Fendrich and News Researcher Judith Asubel contributed to this report.
Written on 08/27/2014, 11:04 am by Associated Press
(AP) — U.S. Forest Service officials say they're ready to unveil a plan Wednesday for what to do with millions of trees killed in California's Rim Fire that stand at the center of a conflict between environmentalists and loggers. Wildlife advocates want to leave the dead trees in place, saying snag forests provide a rich habitat for spotted owls and black-backed woodpeckers. Loggers say they favor sending the trees to sawmills to help pay for replanting the forest. Last year's Rim Fire was the largest wildfire in recorded history to sweep through California's Sierra Nevada mountains. A deer hunter has been charged with sparking the massive fire that started Aug. 17, 2013, and burned more than 400 square miles of the Stanislaus National Forest, Yosemite National Park's backcountry and private timber land.
Written on 08/27/2014, 11:03 am by 
MAE ANDERSON, AP Technology Writer
(AP) — Time Warner Cable said Wednesday that service was largely restored after a problem during routine maintenance caused a nationwide outage of its Internet service for hours. The company said it is still investigating the cause of the problem, which occurred with its Internet backbone — the paths that local or regional networks connect to in order to carry data long distances. The problem affected all of Time Warner Cable's markets and started at 4:30 a.m. Eastern, sparking widespread complaints on social networks. Service was largely restored by 6 a.m. The company is working to bring all customers back online. Time Warner Cable, which is in the process of being bought by rival Comcast Corp. for $45 billion, has about 11.4 million high-speed data subscribers in 29 states. The Federal Communications Commission is reviewing the deal. The New York State Department of Public Service will investigate the outage as part of its review of Comcast's proposed merger with New York-based Time Warner Cable, said New York Governor Andrew Cuomo in a Wednesday statement. There are major outages of at least one telecom provider every year, although typically they aren't national, said Tim Farrar, an analyst at TMF Associates. "AT&T had a major outage back in April, Comcast had one last October. Verizon Wireless had several national outages on its 4G network back in 2012," he said. "Usually it is related to bugs in new technology, and occasionally to routine maintenance where someone did something wrong." Separately, on Tuesday, the FCC said Time Warner Cable would pay $1.1 million to resolve outage reporting violations. The FCC found that Time Warner Cable did not report disruptions in service to its networks to the FCC in a timely manner. In addition to the payment, the company is submitting a three-year plan to make sure it will comply with the reporting rules. Time Warner Cable shares rose 64 cents to $147.23 during midday trading.
Written on 08/27/2014, 11:01 am by MEG KINNARD, Associated Press
(AP) — Have you ever been hurt in a company softball or kickball game? The South Carolina Supreme Court says you may be entitled to workers' compensation. On Wednesday, the court ruled that Stephen Whigham, who was injured in a company kickball game, is entitled to workers' compensation benefits because he was required to attend the game as part of his job. Whigham worked for Jackson Dawson Communications, a public relations firm. With the encouragement of his boss, he organized a kickball game as a team-building event for employees. He rented a facility and had T-shirts made. During the Friday afternoon game, Whigham shattered two bones in his leg while trying to avoid being tagged out. He underwent two surgeries and has been told that he'll ultimately need a knee replacement, according to court documents. A hearing will be held to figure out how much Whigham should get. Workers' compensation commissioners initially denied Whigham's claim, saying that he hadn't been required to be at the game. An appeals court upheld that ruling, but the high court said Whigham had to be there because he organized the game, so it had become part of his job duties. "Although the event may have been voluntary for company employees generally, the undisputed facts unequivocally indicate Whigham was expected to attend as part of his professional duties," the court wrote. Justices also pointed to testimony from Whigham's boss, who said he would have been "surprised and shocked" if Whigham hadn't showed up. In a dissenting opinion, two justices wrote they would have upheld the commission's decision to deny benefits because it wasn't clear if Whigham had to attend the game. Even if he had to be there, those justices wrote that it wasn't clear that he had to actually play.
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:59 am by Associated Press
(AP) — San Francisco officials are set to announce $100,000 in funding to help city residents facing deportation for living in the country illegally obtain an attorney. The San Francisco Chronicle reports (http://bit.ly/1qKKKBl) that the money will go to the nonprofit Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights, which will use it to provide free legal representation. The funding is expected to be announced on Wednesday. Supervisor David Chiu says people have to have at least a fighting chance to stay in the country for the Pledge of Allegiance's commitment to justice for all to mean anything. Research suggests at least for children, having an attorney significantly increases their chances of avoiding deportation. New York City has a similar program, and California recently announced a proposal to provide $3 million to immigration attorneys.
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:56 am by 
BARBARA ORTUTAY, 
KEN SWEET, AP Business Writers
(AP) — Video games have been a spectator sport since teenagers crowded around arcade machines to watch friends play "Pac-Man." And for decades, kids have gathered in living rooms to marvel at how others master games like "Street Fighter II" and "Super Mario Bros." But today there's San Francisco-based Twitch, the online network that attracts millions of visitors, most of whom watch live and recorded footage of other people playing video games —in much the same way that football fans tune in to ESPN. Twitch's 55 million monthly users viewed over 15 billion minutes of content on the service in July, making Twitch.tv one of the world's biggest sources of Internet traffic. According to network services company Sandvine, Twitch generates more traffic in the U.S. than HBO Go, the streaming service that's home to popular shows such as "Game of Thrones" and "Girls." Fans watch for the same reasons ancient Romans flocked to the Colosseum: to witness extraordinary displays of agility and skill. Jacob Malinowski, a 16-year-old Twitch fan who lives outside of Milwaukee, admits that some may question the entertainment value of Twitch's content. "(But) I think it's interesting because you get to watch someone who's probably better at the game than you are," he says. "You can see what they do and copy what they do and get better." Amazon's commitment to purchase Twitch for nearly $1 billion this week is an acknowledgement that the service's loyal fan base and revenue streams from ads and channel subscriptions present enormous opportunity. Most Twitch viewers are gamers themselves who not only see the live and recorded video sessions as a way to sharpen their abilities, but also as a way to interact with star players in chatrooms or simply be entertained. Sorah Devlin, a 31-year-old mother of two from Geneva, New York, says she watches Twitch with her 7-year-old son and 4 year-old daughter and enjoys it more than children's television programming. Their game of choice is "Minecraft," which lets players build —or break— things out of cubes and explore a blocky 3-D world around them. Devlin and her kids watch popular "Minecraft" players who go by names such as iBallisticSquid and SuperChache show their skills. The players, she says, have a sense of humor and are good at keeping the content "at most PG" so she is comfortable watching them with the kids. "He likes being able to ask questions and it made him open up more," she says of her son. As for Amazon's purchase, Devlin says she was "kind of surprised, but I think they are starting to realize that gamers are much more of an enterprise than they thought." Indeed, Twitch fans are the stuff of advertisers' dreams. They are mostly male and between the ages of 18 and 49, an important demographic for advertisers. Twitch's so-called user engagement is high. Nearly half of visitors spend 20 or more hours a week watching Twitch video, according to the company. "You've got a hyper-growth platform with a niche audience," says Nathaniel Perez, global head of social media at advertising firm SapientNitro. "It's basically the best you can get, from an advertisers' perspective." As a result, Twitch commands premium prices from advertisers. The company's cost per thousand views, or the amount an advertiser pays to run one video ad 1,000 times, is $16.84 in the U.S., according to video ad-buying software company TubeMogul. That's well above the average $9.11 per thousand advertisers typically pay for video ads placed on other sites. "Their users are relevant to so many advertisers," says Alex Debelov, CEO and co-founder of Virool, a video advertising platform company. Twitch can be lucrative for talented gamers too. The site allows some gamers who set up channels —what the company calls "broadcasters"— to charge $5 monthly subscription fees to viewers. Plus Twitch gives a portion of all ad revenue to broadcasters. Twitch didn't start out as a video game-focused company. The company spun out of Justin.tv, a quirky service that revolved around a video feed tracking the daily activities of co-founder Justin Kan. The focus shifted to live video for gamers in 2011. Brett Butz, 26, who works as a compliance officer outside of Boston, says he's spent $20 to $25 to watch content on Twitch, which is "more than I ever paid for YouTube," which also broadcasts games. While YouTube is popular with gamers, Butz says he prefers Twitch as a place to view games. Amazon is promising to let its newest acquisition operate independently. But for some gamers, the deal brands Twitch with a corporate stamp. "I'm curious to see if, in a year, it'll still have cache," says Patrick Markey, psychology professor at Villanova University who focuses on video games. "It's definitely considered a gamer platform but now that Amazon is buying it, is it becoming mainstream ... is it going to lose its coolness?"
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:53 am by 
MARCY GORDON, AP Business Writer
(AP) — Financial firms that sell securities backed by loans, like the kind that fueled the 2008 financial crisis, will have to give investors details on borrowers' credit record and income under action taken Wednesday by federal regulators. The Securities and Exchange Commission adopted the rules for securities linked to mortgages and auto loans on a 5-0 vote. The commissioners also imposed new conflict-of-interest rules on the agencies that rate the debt of companies, governments and issues of securities. That vote split 3-2 along party lines, with the two Republican commissioners opposing adoption of the rules. Home mortgages bundled into securities and sold on Wall Street soured after the housing bubble burst in 2007, losing billions in value. The vast sales of risky securities ignited the crisis that plunged the economy into the deepest recession since the Great Depression and brought a taxpayer bailout of banks. In requiring sellers of the securities to provide information on borrowers' credit and income, the aim is to enable investors to better assess the risks of the loans underlying the securities. "These reforms will make a real difference to investors and to our financial markets," SEC Chair Mary Jo White said before the vote. A recent report by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York showed that U.S. auto loans jumped to the highest level in eight years this spring, fueled by a big increase in lending to risky borrowers. The Fed also said that loans to borrowers with weak credit, known as subprime loans, continue to make up a smaller proportion of total auto loans than before the recession. Still, the rapid increase in subprime auto lending has raised concerns among federal regulators in recent months that it could set off a wave of defaults such as occurred in the mortgage market collapse. Because auto loans are packaged into securities, an increase in auto loan defaults could be amplified. The new rules on so-called asset-backed securities and credit rating agencies were called for under the sweeping financial overhaul law enacted in 2010 in response to the financial meltdown. The rules take effect in 60 days. A number of big banks, including JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup and Goldman Sachs, have been accused by the government of abuses in sales of mortgage securities in the years leading up to the crisis. Together, they have paid hundreds of millions in penalties to settle civil charges brought by the SEC, which accused them of deceiving investors about the quality of the securities they sold. In recent months, the Justice Department and state regulators have reached multibillion-dollar civil settlements over mortgage securities with JPMorgan, Bank of America and Citigroup. The new rules require credit rating agencies to report to the SEC on their financial safeguards to ensure that their ratings are determined through a fair process. The agencies' sales people will be barred from participating in the ratings process. And agencies will have to review and potentially revise their ratings in cases where an employee was later hired by a company he or she rated. The rating agencies are key financial gatekeepers. Their ratings can affect a company's ability to raise or borrow money and also can influence how much investors pay for securities. Critics say the agencies have a built-in conflict of interest because they are paid by the same companies they rate. The three big agencies — Moody's, Standard & Poor's and Fitch — were widely criticized for giving low-risk ratings to the risky mortgage securities being sold ahead of the crisis, as they reaped lucrative fees. Investigations by a Senate panel and a congressionally appointed independent commission found that the three agencies contributed to the crisis by awarding high ratings to securities based on subprime mortgages. The three big agencies together account for nearly 95 percent of the ratings market. Several other smaller rating agencies are officially recognized by the SEC. A key problem is that companies choose which firms rate them and then pay for those ratings, critics say. It's like having a pitcher choose the umpire for a baseball game, they contend, and it puts pressure on the agencies to award better ratings in order to secure repeat business. Critics say a better solution would be to create a government board that randomly assigns agencies to rate companies. Congress debated that idea, but ultimately decided not to direct regulators to adopt such rules. Instead, lawmakers asked the SEC to study the idea.
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:49 am by TOM MURPHY, AP Business Writer
(AP) — Insurers can no longer reject customers with expensive medical conditions thanks to the health care overhaul, but there's still wiggle room for them to discourage the sickest and costliest patients from enrolling. Insurance companies can exclude some well-known cancer hospitals or certain individual specialists who treat pricey conditions from the list of providers they cover under a plan. They can dissuade HIV patients from signing up for coverage by requiring heavy initial payments of the bill for their prescriptions. They also might simply wait for competitors to jump into a market first and take all the risky patients who were hungry for coverage. Consumer advocates and industry insiders warn that insurers are using tactics like these to limit their coverage of the sick, which can make it difficult for the people who need insurance the most to find the right plan. Narrow provider networks, in particular, have become more common, especially in coverage sold on new public health insurance exchanges created by the overhaul. "It's the same insurance companies that are up to the same strategies: Take in as much premium as possible and pay out as little as possible," said Jerry Flanagan, an attorney with the advocacy group Consumer Watchdog. Insurers acknowledge that people may see changes in coverage, driven in part by how the overhaul affects insurance. But they say prudent business practices, not discrimination against the sick, are the key factors behind the trends that have raised concerns. They also point out that if customers find a plan they don't like, they generally have plenty of additional options to choose from both on and off the exchanges. They also note that the overhaul takes several steps to discourage them from avoiding costly patients. The law prevents them from marketing or designing a plan that would discourage someone from applying based on their health. It also calls for insurers to chip into a pool that compensates competitors who wind up with a more expensive patient population. That lowers their incentive for discouraging the sick from enrolling. "Health plans now guarantee coverage for individuals and families regardless of health status," said Clare Krusing, a spokeswoman for the trade association America's Health Insurance Plans, or AHIP. There are three major ways insurers still might steer sick or expensive patients away from their coverage: — FORM NARROW NETWORKSInsurers can lower their chances for covering patients with expensive medical conditions like cancer and autism simply by limiting the number of doctors and hospitals in a coverage network. That would send those patients searching for coverage elsewhere because they don't want to pay expensive, out-of-network rates.Narrow insurer networks might include only 30 percent or less of a market's hospitals, as opposed to 70 percent or more for a broader network, according to the consulting firm McKinsey & Co. An Associated Press survey of the nation's top cancer centers this spring found that patients covered under the health care law could encounter barriers to access in many cases. For instance, MD Anderson Cancer Center said it is included in the networks of less than half of the plans sold on the Houston area's public insurance exchange. Aside from excluding patients, narrow networks also can help insurers form a healthy customer base by lowering the cost of coverage. A narrow provider network gives insurers leverage to squeeze better rates out of doctors who want to be included in that network in order to get the insurer's business. Better rates lead to lower premiums, and young and healthy people generally shop for insurance based on price. "They're the ones that don't check the provider directory," said Bob Laszewski, a former insurance executive turned industry consultant. Insurers say plans with narrow networks are among many coverage choices consumers can make when they shop for insurance, and they are not an attempt to dodge the sick. Narrow provider networks help maximize value by grouping providers "who have a track record of delivering high-quality, cost-effective care," said Krusing, the AHIP spokeswoman. She added that insurers who sell coverage on the overhaul's public insurance exchanges have to offer more than one plan. It would make little sense for them to steer patients away from one plan when that person could just choose another option from the same insurer with broader benefits. The overhaul sets some standards for provider networks, and a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services spokesman said regulators plan to increase their review of these networks for 2015 to figure out whether they need to strengthen requirements. — CAUSE PRESCRIPTION STICKER SHOCKSome plans are requiring patients to initially pay 30 percent or more of the bill for drugs that can cost several thousand dollars a month. HIV drugs and multiple sclerosis medications are among them. The overhaul caps the annual amounts patients are required to pay for these so-called out-of-pocket expenses. Still, some say the higher cost-sharing requirements can steer patients that need these medications away from enrolling. "It's another way to send a message to sicker patients that says, 'If you're taking these medications, we'd rather not sell insurance to you," Flanagan said. The AIDS Institute filed a complaint with U.S. Health and Human Services department earlier this summer against four Florida insurance companies over the issue. Insurers say their plans follow HHS guidelines and cover all medically necessary HIV drugs. They also note that the price patients pay reflects, to some degree, what drugmakers charge for their medications. Insurers also say customers have options if they find a prescription plan they dislike. In some markets, a customer may more than a dozen choices, some of which might offer better coverage or a lower-cost alternative for their prescriptions. But AIDS Institute Deputy Executive Director Carl Schmid said he worries that patient choices will dissolve over time if the high prescription payments spread to other insurers in a market, and "the good plans will become the bad plans." — ENTER MARKETS CAUTIOUSLYAnother way insurers might land a healthier population is by playing the waiting game.The nation's largest health insurer, UnitedHealth Group Inc., will dive into the overhaul's public insurance exchanges with plans to sell 2015 individual coverage in 24 exchanges. That's up from only four in 2014. These exchanges debuted last fall and offer shoppers a chance to compare and buy policies, often with help from an income-based tax credit. UnitedHealth's delayed growth could be a savvy way to avoid some of the sickest patients who likely rushed to sign up for insurance in the initial year of the exchanges, said Laszewski, the industry consultant. That could free UnitedHealth to enter markets and sign up healthier patients after other insurers, most likely nonprofits with deep community roots, have "taken the bullet" the first year, he said. Health insurers are still figuring out plan options for 2015, so there are no signs yet that other insurers are following UnitedHealth's example. UnitedHealth said it had always planned a measured approach. It needed a year to set up provider networks and see how the exchanges worked in their debut before deciding whether to plunge in deeper. Spokesman Tyler Mason said the insurer wasn't waiting for those competitors to sign up all the sick patients first. "Philosophically, we've always said the marketplaces would evolve over time and that they would be good markets and that reform is needed," he said. ___Associated Press writer Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar contributed to this report from Washington, D.C.
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:37 am by Business Journal staff
Madera County released its 2013 crop report this week, showing gross ag value growing by 9 percent over the year before to $1.89 billion. Ag value had already hit a record $1.73 billion in 2012, a growth of 11 percent from the year prior. Madera County Agricultural Commissioner Stevie McNeill said the latest increase is even more impressive considering ongoing drought conditions in the state. "The last four years have seen a steady increase in total commodity values," said McNeill in the report. "And in nine of the last ten years, Madera County commodity production has exceeded one billion dollars." Almonds, including nut meats and hulls, retained its top crop rank for the fourth year in a row, growing 27.93 percent to $623.48 million in total value. Grapes remained in second place, increasing 3.64 percent to $373.85 million, while milk held the third spot after an 11.89 percent increase to $323.11 million. Among categories, vegetable crops in value by 16.79 percent to $40.68 million, reflecting increasing acreage of processing tomatoes and strong prices for miscellaneous vegetables. Forest products like timber and firewood increased 16.06 percent to $1.27 million thanks to an increase in sawlog prices. Helped by strong almond market prices, total fruit and nut crops saw an 11.54 percent increase in value to $1.27 billion. Milk and other livestock and poultry products also benefitted from improving prices with an 11.57 percent increase to $330.93 million. Apiary products jumped 9.83 percent to $33.87 due to increases in the price of honey and beeswax. Decreases were seen in field crops, falling by 16.10 percent to $87.59 million due to decreases in acreages and depressed prices of alfalfa, corn, oats, wheat and forage. Livestock and poultry values fell 2.13 percent to $114.94 million due to reductions in flock size.

Latest State News

Written on 08/27/2014, 11:04 am by Associated Press
(AP) — U.S. Forest Service officials...
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:59 am by Associated Press
(AP) — San Francisco officials are set...
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:56 am by 
BARBARA ORTUTAY, 
KEN SWEET, AP Business Writers
(AP) — Video games have been a...
Written on 08/26/2014, 1:36 pm by Associated Press
(AP) — A Southern California food...

Latest National News

Written on 08/27/2014, 11:12 am by TERESA M. WALKER, AP Pro Football Writer
(AP) — Ravens running back Ray Rice is...
Written on 08/27/2014, 11:03 am by 
MAE ANDERSON, AP Technology Writer
(AP) — Time Warner Cable said Wednesday...
Written on 08/27/2014, 11:01 am by MEG KINNARD, Associated Press
(AP) — Have you ever been hurt in a...
Written on 08/27/2014, 10:53 am by 
MARCY GORDON, AP Business Writer
(AP) — Financial firms that sell...